Monthly Archives: July 2016

Sip2Sim and the OnePlus Two

Andrews and Arnold do an interesting service where they supply a SIM card which connects to VOIP at their end. Annoyingly, they don’t have a sensibly usable set of 07… UK mobile numbers they can route onto VOIP to go with the service, but since my OnePlus Two has two SIM slots, that seemed like a way to give it a punt…

Double SIM carding it ... like a pro

Double SIM carding it … like a pro (this is the drawer from the OnePlus Two)

The particular variant of SIM I ordered (O2/EU Voice) doesn’t push out to Nano SIM, instead requiring a pair of scissors and a steady hand (or a proper tool, but who has one of those?) As you can see from the picture, I got away with the scissors and it even worked afterwards:

Custom network name and two signal strength indicators

Custom network name and two signal strength indicators

Android has some pretty impressive native support for more than one SIM, and shows two signal strength selectors as you’d expect. As you can see at the top left, the SIM networks (operator names) are shown with a pipe separating them. For some reason you can’t fiddle with this on the control pages, but you can set it when ordering and contact support to alter it.

I ordered a London number on AAISP’s VOIP service to go with the SIM, and that all works as expected. Texts are a bit clunky (presenting as from “SIP2SIM”), but it looks like that may be configurable/changable.

Mobile data appears to go via NAT and emerge from an IP address registered to Manx Telecom.

The two things I really wanted to play with are setting up my own Asterisk again, and using the roaming to get decent data on the train up north. I’ll report back when I’ve had a play.

Station parking

I’ve parked in the long stay at Didcot station a few times recently. It works well enough, but in common with the Oxford park and ride car parks, and many others, the payment mechanism feels clunky.

First time in, you fire up your phone, bash in a long series of numbers to give it your registration and card details, and pay. Second time, I think they’re slightly too paranoid – they remember the location and car (good) but want the last three digits off the stored card (sigh).

What really grinds my gears, however, is that all these car parks have enforcement based on ANPR. So why can’t I go to a website, bash in my car’s registration number, my card details and my mobile phone number, and tick a box saying “charge me and text me whenever I park at one of your sites”. No faffing around on the day, just turn up and park.

It couldn’t be because that would eliminate a revenue stream from mistakes and over-payment based on guesses about return times … now could it?

Classing up the kitchen, part 2

Following on from my first post on this, behold my classed up kitchen with LED worktop lighting:

IMG_20160717_213240

Looks great, instant-on, uses less power than the old fluorescents and leaves lots of space under the cupboards for the radio, hooks to hang things on, etc. I had to use superglue on the LED strips to make them stay put as the adhesive on them wasn’t up to it – but no real surprise there.

Bytemark charging for IPv4 addresses

We‘ve had a server at Bytemark for many years (since the summer of 2009). For the most part they’ve been good, Towards the end of last year, they started charging for extra IPv4 addresses. This came as no great surprise, given the near-exhaustion of this finite resource, but our modest /27 suddenly represented a 1/3 increase in the cost of our server.

Fortunately, Bytemark agreed to waive the increase until our next annual renewal, after I got a bit shirty about mid-term price increases. Which left us with the joy of consolidating our usage. They’re quite right to point out that the advent of SNI support in all modern browsers, and things like sslh mean we don’t need so many addresses any more, but having parcelled them out to my six users in blocks of 4 (making firewalling easier as everyone had a /30), I had a long and tedious consolidation exercise to carry out.

Happily, many reboots and much faffing later, we’re nearly there and should be able to hand back 16 addresses of our 32 next month, thus cutting our cost by £192+VAT/year.

This has prompted me to take a closer look at going all-IPv6. I’ve ordered a small IPv6 only VM from Mythic Beasts to play with. Teething troubles aside, it works quite well, with inbound proxying for the websites and NAT64 for outbound access to IPv4 services. Running just the one IP stack feels much cleaner and easier to administer, and opens up the possibility of using an IP address per website/service with no danger of running out.

Edit: Bytemark’s original announcement failed to mention that it’s £1 plus VAT for each IPv4 address. Sigh.

Classing up the kitchen, part 1

Since my kitchen radio is older than I am and has various bits missing, I got myself one of these to mount under the cupboards to replace it. This should also help reduce the amount of stuff on the surfaces and make it easier to clean. Of course, this is the obvious time to replace the flickery under cupboard fluorescents and their bulky fittings with a few metres of LED strip. Testing:

IMG_20160707_230817The hard part is going to be cleaning a decade’s worth of grime off the underside of the cupboards to make the surface clean enough for the LED strip to stick to, but the result should look properly classy. Update to come when I’m done…

The imminent demise of Sixxs?

As a long-term user of SixXS, I got an e-mail earlier this year about how I should stop using a tunnel for IPv6 connectivity and ask my ISP for IPv6. And they’ve got a point. After all, now that major bandwidth hogs such as Netflix and Facebook have IPv6 enabled, those tunnels must be shifting some serious traffic.

Having said that, Netflix have recently started proclaiming Sixxs is a “proxy service” which they can’t allow because it lets you pretend to be in the UK wherever in the world you are. Which is fair enough if tedious, and has forced me to move my TV-connected devices onto my guest WiFi network, where there is no IPv6.

I would call my ISP, but EE has been swallowed by BT, who seem to have finally got their act together on IPv6 – if the date comes true. But I’ll probably have migrated off to A&A by then.