Monthly Archives: September 2018

User experience

So I bought a new microwave for the church kitchen last weekend, as you do. I’m still not sure whether the old one was indeed “broken” or just “too complicated for ordinary mortals to operate”, but if I can’t make the thing blast some food on full power, then it’s got to go.

This is the right way to do microwave controls, especially in a shared kitchen:

Two knobs are all you need

The wrong way is anything involving lots of buttons and confusing choices about what sort of food it is.

Crossrail

It didn’t come as much of a surprise to me that Crossrail will be late. And though I personally am annoyed that the day when I can jump directly from Paddington to nearly all the places I ever visit in London (most of them are in Docklands) has been pushed back, I do have one thing to say.

Spare a thought for the poor sod who had to ‘fess up to the fact that it was all going to be late. I’ve been there on software projects, and it’s not fun.

How hard can it be?

Sometimes, I wonder if it’s me getting old or large corporations failing to shut up and take my money. Or in this case, somebody else’s money.

Although this is my last year “doing the money” for St Columba’s, I’m still one of an elite handful of people who “work in IT” and thus do all the geeky stuff. And our new minister moving into the manse should have been a chance to enjoy spending the church’s money on a stack of equipment (laptop, mobile phone, etc.) and sorting out an internet connection.

Oh dear, sorting out an internet connection. Here we go again. The default option was Virgin Media: after all, we already have one site with them, so no need for a tedious credit check and a load of faff, just call their sales team (very efficient) and get given a date for a site survey. That gets done, though annoyingly the team they send takes about five minutes to say “we’ll need to run a duct, somebody else does that” and buzz off.

They then fail totally to turn up to do the digging, blame it on “our landlords” (a likely story since we own the house outright – though it’s possible some tedious neighbour complained to the management company about digging up a shared driveway). They claimed it could be sorted, I decided I wanted it fixed before I turned 40, and moved on.

OK then, let’s use the BT phone line already in place. Zen are a supplier I know and trust in situations like this (i.e.: not interested in switching every 18 months to get a good deal, just want good service at a reasonable and stable price). Unfortunately, entering the post code on their site results in a blank grey page. And their social media team seem completely incapable of getting that sorted.

Finally, third time lucky, IDNet got the business, and (aside from some questionable non-default setting choices on their router), seem to have done everything right. I was particularly pleased that their team e-mailed me after I put in an order based on postcode, saying “there’s a stopped line in the property – want us to re-start it?” and giving me the number to confirm using 17070. It’s been up and running for 24 hours so far, so let’s see how it goes…

Bytemark bought by iomart

And so, after sixteen years, Bytemark has been bought out. In common with rather a lot of other customers (if Twitter is anything to go by), I was a bit saddened to hear about this via The Register rather than an announcement. I don’t blame the owners in the slightest – they have every right to cash in on their hard work after sixteen years. And whilst the construction of their own data centre undoubtedly gave them a cost edge over the long term, it no doubt needed to be paid for first.

Unlike other customers, I’m not going to idealise the company’s previous state – my nine year happy relationship with them has been based on our dedicated server Just Working for the most part, and me never needing to contact support. On the rare occasions when I have, it’s been a mixed experience. Such as the time when my query about adding a .mx domain name to their DNS service got a keyword based response: “your MX records look OK to me”. Or even better, the occasion when they managed to e-mail me another customer’s control panel password by accident.

I won’t be making any sudden moves, and if the founders are to be believed, neither will Bytemark.